Fontainebleau

Recent Uploads tagged fontainebleau

			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/100178647@N03/">kalzennyg</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/100178647@N03/49743838461/" title="on se souvient  des balades en forêt..."><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49743838461_fc4b94612f_m.jpg" width="240" height="159" alt="on se souvient  des balades en forêt..." /></a></p>

			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/ajmitchell-prehistory/">AJ Mitchell (prehistory)</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/49731092607/" title="Pointing, shaping and bending wood"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49731092607_ac23072636_m.jpg" width="240" height="140" alt="Pointing, shaping and bending wood" /></a></p>

<p>Details of the rock art station 'Vente Bourbon 3' found by D. Caldwell around 2014 (published 2015) - one of many important and pristine new stations found recently in the forest of Fontainebleau by this team. <br />
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By searching on the words 'Fontainebleau' and 'Mesolithic' it is possible to find a significant number of results pointing to a date calibration for this rock art style and area of upwards of 11,000 years. After the work of D.Cadwell et al, arguments are appearing for a Bronze age date of four of five thousand years ago. <br />
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The newly found stations like 'Vente Bourbon 3' adhere to the general style of rock art from the Fontainebleau region, even if some other stations are of a larger line scale. Typically there are many straight lines, triangles, crosses and grids. The lines seem closer to the 'V' shape profile typical of metal tools rather than the 'U' shape of stone tools, but as the hardness of the sandstone is unknown to me, and as many authors seem happy that they were made by mesolithic flints, I keep this observation open - if weighted to metal.<br />
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There are several categories where crosses appear: <br />
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- Late neolithic and chalcolithic: often integrated with cups or merging with canals. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/47491604471/in/album-72157684836166343/">www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/47491604471/i...</a><br />
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- Christian: styles include Maltese, St Andrews, Greek, St Jean...<br />
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- Alphabetical: x(yz...). A &quot;glyph&quot; that goes beyond a pictogram into pure abstraction, gaining meaning via conventions of juxtaposition. Monograms need to be watched for, but are of a one-off style and do stand out when multiple examples exist.<br />
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- Doodle: +xX. Perhaps more hypothetical and modern than anything else, as lines in stone take repetition, sweat, application, an effort that goes beyond the spirit of doodling and its formal manifest - ornamentation: perhaps more suited to wood or paint.<br />
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- Fakes: petroglyphic artefacts potentially redirecting prehistory e.g. Pedra de les Creus, Dolmen del Barranc d'Espolla.<br />
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/47522221221/in/album-72157684836166343/">www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/47522221221/i...</a><br />
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- Pollisoir: whilst nearly all sharpening stones tend to be straight and often cleanly parallel lines, crossed sharpening canals should be considered when looking at the specific Fontainebleau's art.<br />
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- Game: 'Pachisi' is a cross game, but more regularly found are variants of 'Nine Men's Morris'... here crossed lines tend to be in squares and over-worn, so there is little chance of confusion. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/38488292972/in/album-72157673388100805/">www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/38488292972/i...</a><br />
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- Political variants: (Iron cross, Swastika). Individuals such as Pepito Meijón need to be factored for, but as a rule the problems tend to be from people who are obsessed with a modern symbol backdating meaning onto a distant homologue.<br />
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There are two crosses on the 'Vente Bourdon 3&quot; station and both have one splayed stem. I have rotated the above captures to display both splays to the top (see the site photo below for the original disposition). Even if one is a little deeper, both crosses are similar, and it is perhaps the case that neither falls easily into one of the above categories, and I will argue for an additional category of &quot;woodfolk cross&quot;.<br />
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One of the crosses is deeper cut than the other glyphs. Despite this, the depth of cut does not seem to result from repeated return visits from multiple users. Christian and neolithic crosses are often over-written on multiple occasions, each with a slightly different emphasis, resulting in a rounded but careful average. Here the edges are sharp and the envelope line is of similar measure to other glyphs. There are plenty of religious and political wedged crosses, but here there is just one wedge stem and no need for the wedge stem to be in a direction (up...).<br />
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If the cross is not a symbol, then it may be a representation. One slight possibility is a representation of a chalcolithic hypogée which can have a cross of side chambers, but, apart from Castalet, they lacks the 'wedge' and all lack the uniformity or arms.<br />
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The cross is situated in a scrub/forest zone with poor soils when compared with the alluvials to the north and south. A setting between large rivers fed with debit from the high precipitation zone around and within the Alpes (Loire, Seine). Both river banks have deep histories and prehistories of significant populations. <br />
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Other glyphs from this rock art station seem to suggest a pillared stage with steps surely made of logs and split wood. From this relatively convincing representation, it might be possible to isolate other glyphs of Maypoles and tent poles - all made of wood, and these are covered in associated posts and in the relevant Flickr album. A last glyph may represent a rectangular pit-fire with rows of overhanging logs. A lifestyle of tents rather than permanent crofts will have scattered the archaeological residues of lifestyle that may otherwise have helped with date ranges. <br />
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Communities of people specialising in the exploitation and transformation of timber materials will attract an extra regional  public interested in taking away products ...'onto the back of mules in exchange for a pig', 'floating ready-made posts, bows and adapted wood-frame down a river in exchange for flour' and so on. Drawing 'clients' in, and even offering a seasonal 'woodland festival' for potential and real clients; for company and companionship, and in honour of spiritual and cultural traditions, may be the optic that is described by the rock art of 'Vente Bourbon 3'.<br />
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Woodland festivals would change place as the forestry camps move to new copse and glade. New paths to new camps might be signalled by arboroglyphs or marker (knots, feathers, teasels and so on). If the festival's date back to the bronze age or Celtic years then they might have been fully 'advertised' and overt, if they were during Roman occupation, then they may have been codified and suitably 'lost in the woods', and if from the dark ages, the actions would be in reflection of local feudal influence - transparent or codified. The cut off date is the 10th century.<br />
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Changing wood efficiently into forms that are appealing to man can be helped by fire and water (including frost and ice) in addition to blade, wedge, lever and oxen. Blades can be on axes, chisels and, with time, miniaturised onto saws. Fire can burn away roots, wedges can split the hardest oak, axes and oxen can fell and position trees and so on. Knowing how much to burn before removing a trunk, branch or pole from a fire: to then shape - knowing to have enough water, and how to stop the water from quickly evaporating. Understanding how to 'read' the capacity of a tree and even encourage the life of a forest - these are woodland skills that can surpass those of crofters, shepherds and new generations of village and even towns-folk.<br />
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Copses, woods and forests can seem to be everywhere - even after the famous deforestations of late prehistory, and travelling to exchange for a product that is made from timber would require there to be either a gain of time or quality, or a level of social specialisation that resulted in a significant skill divergence between atrophying and 'high craft'. Cutting down a tree, shaping a post pole into a point, bending poles adapted  for stretched material coracle boats; key structures for wicker-and-daub frame work; sharpening wooden spears or hardening wooden levers (as Odysseus), preparing shepherds crooks, bows, baskets and more - all examples of woodcrafts that tend to turn to dust with the passage of time, to the point where elements with common points of origin may not be easily clarified by xylologues. Flint tools travelled great distance - might high quality processed wooden materials have travelled short distances?<br />
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Red hot ends to trunk and branch need to be seriously extinguished prior to chisel work as apparent mat grey so often wants to rekindle. Pools of water would heat and the hot waters and their associated steams might in turn help to bend poles into new directions. A cross shaped pit would allow several mutually beneficial activities to coexist. A wedge shape to one arm of a cross shaped pool would offer options for intermediate bending angles under 90 degrees. A wedge shaped slope would also allow persons to enter the pool to adjust items. <br />
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Making a cross shaped pool would require a knowledge of pit fires, and well managed pit-fires could quickly become monolithic pools. Wet clay keeps great heat inside a shape and high heat differentials cause cracks. Days of red-hot embers 'burn' and crack stone to a point where cracks can be exploited with wooden levers, wedges, heavy pounders and other tools. Once a cross-pool is made, the increases of efficiency from the asset might assure a quality of product that is unavailable to new farmers and shepherds. Any cracks in the pools' ground-rock can be filled with a horse-hair cob to make the 'cistern' water-tight. Just such a pool in a woodland festival might become a feature for rural peoples from either side of the Celtic period; peoples known to be interested in the spiritual and 'Epicurean' qualities of water. A long pit-fire can heat large river-stones to high temperatures and these might be transferred to a cleaned woodfolk-cross to provide warm water bathing aside seasonal feast, dance and rite. This detail might put the cross at the centre of seasonal woodland festivals, and the festival either side of Celtic traditions.<br />
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Iron age woodcrafts and early medieval woodcrafts may use a wide range of blades, and sharpening these smaller blades on sandstone during moments of storm or relaxation might produce some polissoir trenches so visible on the Fontainebleau rock art stations. That some of these lines drifted into doodle and play needs to be considered for some stations. That other Fontainebleau stations were purely representational - with high schematic line, would be proud and human. <br />
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The 10th century saw the forest enveloped by Royal jurisdiction. The impact of this change in definition on monolithic vestiges is unknown, but may have been systematic and destructive. These hypothetical woodfolk were probably  not literate, but seem to have become aware of the scale of letters. They seem to have shared with other cultures a desire to find pictograms that concisely sum up key cultural elements, and linking some 'glyph' elements with research into pictograms and even the phase-change into runes seems valid. <br />
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In certain rural areas it can be argued that the iron age spread into the early centuries of medieval, and it might be from this optic that I would want to tentatively place the Fontainebleau rock art of woodland folk and craft.<br />
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AJM 05.04.20</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/ajmitchell-prehistory/">AJ Mitchell (prehistory)</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/49726146248/" title="Accommodation - potentially temporary"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49726146248_f4419cb602_m.jpg" width="240" height="163" alt="Accommodation - potentially temporary" /></a></p>

<p>Details of the rock art station 'Vente Bourbon 3' found by D. Caldwell around 2014 (published 2015) - one of many important new and pristine stations found in the forest of Fontainebleau.<br />
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From the remains of the homo erectus Terra Amata abris/tent in Nice up into the medieval ages: proto abris-tent to frame tent - portable hut. Covered in raw hide, greased leather or woven material, a tent can be packed away and re-positioned at speed and without the unknowns that come with the need to look for thatch. <br />
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Both post 'transport dragon' and aside, the tent that is today referred to as a Canadian tent (triangular with poles) is in truth from a wide geographical range.  Simple triangular tents with either vertical poles, possibly with a ridgepole or even side frames, were regularly documented from early medieval finds and manuscripts. Nordic and Viking finds offer further details and the simple form will have ornamented through into prehistory.<br />
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Square box tents and tents with central poles simply add to the range of imaginative solutions each with a pro and a con. <br />
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Whilst there is little in the schematic rock art lines to strongly suggest tents, the interpretation of the adjacent schematic stage (see below) seems to be, in my mind, solid. A stage suggests other activities of rite or festivity, and one by one interpretations for other glyphs are suggested (see asociated posts below). Festivities were often on rises or fields aside villages. Temporary tent villages for persons following flocks or logging, or temporary festive sites drawn towards lyrical and 'meaningful' monoliths, or clandestine celebrations behind the backs of authoritarian clergy - these are all potential narratives.<br />
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The small scale of the 'glyphs' might suggest a date where the influence of writing and runes is apparent, which may suggest a date between the iron age and the early medieval. Late neolithic, chalcolithic and bronze age dates cannot be excluded, but weathering rates on the fine sandstone edges needs to be found. To respect a wide calibration, I have tried to draw the tents in a way that might evoke both leather or woven material.<br />
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There are some words that say everything and nothing: 'it', 'truc', 'thing'... An equivalent in rock art would be a mark that signifies something, with the context assigning the final definition. In the context of a stage and a tent, a 'dot' may be a person, in the context of a boundary line with an image of oxen pulling a plough, the same dot may be a 'seed'. Today people do not like to be refereed to as an 'it', or worse still, a 'thing' - but t can happen.<br />
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If dots are people in tents, then there is one tent that has a dot with a tail. The same 'tent' also has lines or 'streamers' attached. If the general scene is a proto or historical schematic visualisation of a festival (May day or Solstice) then there should be a tent that holds the 'May Queen' or other persons of significance. Going to see the 'May Queen' may be the line to the 'dot' and the lines of decoration may be either from the tent down to the ground, or as decorative lines of significance and ornamentation on the ground surface itself. This tent may also be aside a path into the site (see the two lines to the right of the said triangle), and an alternative explanation might be that people are verified at this tent before entering the festivities - and here the lines may even be projected queues of people.<br />
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AJM 04.02.20</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/thomashawk/">Thomas Hawk</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/49718109051/" title="Fontainebleau Miami Beach"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49718109051_e60bc5547e_m.jpg" width="160" height="240" alt="Fontainebleau Miami Beach" /></a></p>

			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/ajmitchell-prehistory/">AJ Mitchell (prehistory)</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/49717702341/" title="Maypole schematics"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49717702341_5371b19ee9_m.jpg" width="240" height="162" alt="Maypole schematics" /></a></p>

<p>Details of the rock art station 'Vente Bourbon 3' found by D. Caldwell around 2014 (published 2015) - one of many important and unpolluted rock art stations recently found in the forest of Fontainebleau.<br />
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After isolating a line composite and projecting it as a representation of a stage (see below), I have looked at other 'glyphs' to see if they might be schematic representations with shared themes.<br />
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The top photograph of a 'glyph' is often referred to as a swastika even if swastikas do not have dots between arms and end bars with a fade. I preferred the term 'ornamented cross'.<br />
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The lower photograph of a 'glyph' has been rotated by 180 degrees and can be seen pictured in its original alcove position to the left of the potential stage (see second image below). As there is no notion of perspective, I have assumed that the 'artist' simply wanted to show diagonal buttress into the base of a pole planted near the potential 'stage', before then extending the lines for a side-on view. With this in mind it makes no difference to rotate the image as pictured above. The local area's soil is sandy, and the bedrock is near the surface, and a Maypole without buttresses may have occurred once, but 'never again' (!). A buttressed pole without dancers might be presented in its schematic simplicity without any cords activated by dancers, or as a simple pole. <br />
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Seen from above and this time with dancers, a Maypole can be a combination of people with cords and dancers taking up the space between. Here a dot represents a space for a person.<br />
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Combining the side image with the schematic image from above and then animating the dots with people results in the  representation above right.<br />
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Today many folk dancers are uniformed into exact local costume and regimented into perfect dance steps. This sense of perfection is very human, and its spirit of modelling and emulation must be envisaged in large get-togethers into the late great ages of prehistory. On saying that, local dances that spin on into evenings can also involve hats falling sideways, buttons coming undone, trousers slacking and dancers exalted aside dancers shy. Rings of onlookers watching circles of dance; interchanging between actor and observer. In the image of Maypole dancing, I have tried to capture this latter energy of informal collective spirit.<br />
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Maypoles are 'trees' of fertility and they symbolise the forces of nature. Erected poles, ornamented poles, selected saplings cut and set or signified trees are all variants of the Maypole that exist throughout quiet and dynamic details of Europe (and not simply a Germanic tradition is can be seen quoted), with other tangents in the rest of the world: north American sun-dance, Siberian Ysyakh, Egypt and so on. Broad rural detailing and specificities require time - deep time - and it is generally accepted that the Maypole celebrations crossed the bridge between late prehistory and history. The wide manifest suggest a point of 'origin' from far further than simply the Iron age (as is quoted).<br />
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A Maypole is a common structure associated with dance and festivity that might be set near a simple stage, and seeing a schematic juxtaposition of these two elements is not shocking.<br />
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In 1579 the Catholic Church made a decree regarding Maypoles making it unlawful to 'walk them in the streets and to plant them with crazy and ridiculous ceremonies' and it is perhaps logical to expect the rock art to have been generated from a prior date. This was not the first time that this Church had involved itself with trees as in 452, the Council at Tours &quot;exhorts the clergy to excommunicate those who, at certain ...trees, are sacrificing to the devil&quot; - with the word &quot;sacrificing&quot; probably imbibed with a little stigmatic interpretation and interchangeable with &quot;dancing around&quot;.<br />
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Attaching cords to the top of a pole can abstract significance from the act of braiding and unbraiding cords of different  colour, as dancers back and forth with a variety of inter-combination. Should this rock art 'glyph' be a representation of a Maypole, then the simple four cord variety may be either an early example (lets imagine a cord for each season) or a simplification (let's say that four cords are enough to communicate to others an inclusion of a Maypole with eight or more becoming messy and looking like a sun).<br />
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Pipes and drums and a small choir of singers: people from an extended region drawn to the magical monoliths; a stage with two sets of stairs and a couple of Maypoles would allow people to dance in lines, circles or to snake around and between. Even those who admit that they cannot dance, or that they are too old to dance, would be drawn to join in or clap as they watch the new generation rub static and emotional memories into trusted contact.<br />
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AJM 31.03.20</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/ajmitchell-prehistory/">AJ Mitchell (prehistory)</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/49713015286/" title="Raised perspectives"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49713015286_faf1c551bd_m.jpg" width="240" height="59" alt="Raised perspectives" /></a></p>

<p>Details of the rock art station 'Vente Bourbon 3' found by D. Caldwell (published 2015) - one of many important new stations found in the forest of Fontainebleau.<br />
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A rock art detail is here presented as a flat template (left), abstracted into line (centre left) and then 'extruded' and  reperceived as a simple stage (centre right); for activities such as dance (right) and other post Celtic and early medieval rural activities that may align to solstice, full moon and other calendar and social justifications. Here each dot is a space for an individual with the representation of a stage that is large enough for 12 people at any one time. Here the activity was 'remembered' or 'envisaged' within a rock art station. Fontainebleau is far from the growing urban influences of Paris and Orléans and perhaps deep in its scrublands, ancient and illiterate ways lasted longest in a world where the scale and approximate graphology of writing was common knowledge.<br />
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Having two sets of steps leading up to the stage would allow for greater numbers of people to rise to elevation for as one group leaves, others arrive, without problems of passing. Dispute over the starting square or numbers allowed on the stage are also reduced by the simple grid.<br />
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AJM 29.03.20<br />
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The traditional dancers were based on a number of initial public domain images.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/66434314@N00/">rhinofiber</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/66434314@N00/49709241057/" title="Miami Dolphins Cheerleader Jennifer walks runway at Miami Dolphi"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49709241057_87b3d623f7_m.jpg" width="159" height="240" alt="Miami Dolphins Cheerleader Jennifer walks runway at Miami Dolphi" /></a></p>

<p>Miami Dolphins Cheerleader Jennifer walks runway at Miami Dolphins Cheerleaders Swimsuit 2014 Calendar Unveiling and Fashion Show at Fontainebleau's LIV nightclub, Miami Beach, FL, September 5, 2013</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/inknsilverlab/">InknSilverLab</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/inknsilverlab/49707397816/" title="Ancien Magasin de distribution militaire"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49707397816_2abda5bb28_m.jpg" width="161" height="240" alt="Ancien Magasin de distribution militaire" /></a></p>

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RMC Tokina 28mm<br />
Ilford FP4Plus 125</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/inknsilverlab/">InknSilverLab</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/inknsilverlab/49706862368/" title="Ancien Magasin de distribution militaire"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49706862368_37a96f3a8d_m.jpg" width="155" height="240" alt="Ancien Magasin de distribution militaire" /></a></p>

<p>Fujica st605<br />
RMC Tokina 28mm<br />
Ilford FP4Plus 125</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/ajmitchell-prehistory/">AJ Mitchell (prehistory)</a> posted a video:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajmitchell-prehistory/49706004432/" title="Fontainebleau: Claude Terrasse"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/31337/49706004432_9130729441_m.jpg" width="240" height="135" alt="Fontainebleau: Claude Terrasse" /></a></p>

<p>From between 40 and 50km up-river and south-east of Paris starts the forest of Fontainebleau - a nucleus of trees and abutting small towns (and a Chateau), rising to the west of the meandering river Seine. The trees of the forest are interspersed with ancient monoliths of sandstone, often worn into romantic form - islands above blankets of bracken-thicket dissected by a hatch of sandy forestry paths. <br />
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There are many mighty parks in the world - Hyde, Richmond, Stanley, Central, Sefton, Boulogne, de Campo - all animated by people and landscape architectures. The forest of Fontainbleau is not comparable, and after pockets of named rock, bouldering and dog walks, it very quickly has very little human activity. It is not a wilderness, but does have some qualities.<br />
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The appearance of a painting by John Constable in the 'Salon de Paris' of 1824 (an artist who executed a painting in situ, thus capturing in real time more of the fragile moments of light and dynamic horizon) provoked a French artistic movement: L'école de Barbizon. <br />
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The forest of Fontainbleau was the 'wilderness' near to Paris, and artists met in the town of Barbizon, and from there walked into the 'endless' with canvas, paint and even entourage, keen to find a juxtaposition of vegetal, mineral, light and experience. A depiction of a painter working in situe with an entourage, from within the forest, appears at the end of this montage.<br />
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The video is interspersed with paintings and drawings from the school, which has a chronology quoted as from 1825 to 1875. These years do assign a palette of colours and perhaps a width of brush (see also the 'Glasgow boys' - with similarities between Barbizon and Kirkcudbright), but with Impressionism taking form between 1874 and 1886, and post impressionism 1880 to 1910 - all involving cores of artists taking paint and canvas out of the studio and into natural light, the Barbizon and its forest of inspiration has been continually active as an inspiration almost until... today; so it is here perhaps worth relaxing the boarders between movements.<br />
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15km north of Barbizon is the town of Corbeil - again a town that breathed the air and influence of both the Seine and the vast forest. The music of this lens test was created to accompany written works of the wood-cut artist and writer Alfred Jarry. Many of the most famous photographs of Jarry having been taken from around houses and river boats from this area. When pictured with his racing bike it is not for a pose, but to document an early enthusiast, happy to regularly cycle across Paris and down the Seine - direction Fontainebleau.<br />
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Jarry was not the only famous writer of the day to live and experience from this semi-detached nature: Mirbeau was in Veneux-Nadon, Goncourt in Barbizon, Mallarmé in Valvins - allowing the area to become known as a 'colony littéraire'. Mallarmé, like Erik Satie, Renoir, Pierre Bonnard and Alfred Jarry, could all hold Claude Terrasse as a music composer of friendship and esteem, and his music is featured in the second half of this short montage. Considered a successor to the satirical and popular Jacques Offenbach, Terrasse provided the music for the opening night of Alfred Jarry's play 'Ubu Roi' in 1896 - one of the stormiest cultural moments of modern history, where the 'great and the good' suddenly realised that they were covered in dust. Terrasse's music for this eventful evening is featured after an introduction for a song composed by the lesser known Charles Pourny, again composed for a text written by Jarry. A few years later, Claude Terrasse would work with the artist Pierre Bonnard for a revised version of Jarry's play.<br />
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The rock art of Fontainbleau is found aside this rich mix of 'Parisian' culture and universal life-force: where walkers might confide with nature whilst whistling melodies from the latest Café-théâtre or Opérette.<br />
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AJM 28.03.20<br />
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A lot of bracken spore and scrambling soil is visible on the hand - lucky the camera was weather proofed.<br />
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Press play and then 'L' and even f11. Escape and f11 a second time to return.</p>
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