Ireland-img_0756

Recent Uploads tagged ireland

			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/gcampbellphoto/">gcampbellphoto</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/gcampbellphoto/49439627338/" title="Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49439627338_d27b5a727f_m.jpg" width="160" height="240" alt="Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)" /></a></p>

<p>I have been lucky to see as many LEO's this week (4) as I have in past couple of years.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/gcampbellphoto/">gcampbellphoto</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/gcampbellphoto/49440101256/" title="Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49440101256_174e7410c3_m.jpg" width="160" height="240" alt="Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)" /></a></p>

<p>I have been lucky to see as many LEO's this week (4) as I have in past couple of years.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/gcampbellphoto/">gcampbellphoto</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/gcampbellphoto/49439628008/" title="Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49439628008_499b92eae1_m.jpg" width="160" height="240" alt="Long-eared Owl (Asio otus)" /></a></p>

<p>I have been lucky to see as many LEO's this week (4) as I have in past couple of years.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/crunchie-carruthers/">Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/crunchie-carruthers/49442930762/" title="Red-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) 25-08-2019"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49442930762_df43f7e9e0_m.jpg" width="240" height="179" alt="Red-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) 25-08-2019" /></a></p>

<p>Red-tailed bumblebee<br />
Bombus lapidarius <br />
<br />
Scientific classification<br />
Kingdom:Animalia<br />
Phylum:Arthropoda<br />
Class:Insecta<br />
Order:Hymenoptera<br />
Family:Apidae<br />
Genus:Bombus<br />
Subgenus:Melanobombus<br />
Species:B. lapidarius<br />
Binomial name<br />
Bombus lapidarius<br />
<br />
Bombus lapidarius is a species of bumblebee in the subgenus Melanobombus. Commonly known as the red-tailed bumblebee, B. lapidarius can be found throughout much of Central Europe. Known for its distinctive black and red body, this social bee is important in pollination<br />
<br />
Taxonomy and phylogeny<br />
<br />
The red-tailed bumblebee is a part of the order Hymenoptera, family Apidae, and the genus Bombus, which includes many species including Bombus genalis, Bombus angustus, and Bombus nobilis<br />
<br />
Description and identification<br />
<br />
Red-tailed cuckoo bumblebee parasitizes the nests of the red-tailed bumblebee<br />
The red-tailed bumblebee is typically distinguished by its black body with red markings around the abdomen. Worker females and the queen look similar, except the queen is much larger than the worker females. Males typically have both the red and black coloration along with a yellow band around the abdomen and yellow markings on the face. Further, B. lapidarius tend to have a medium-sized proboscis, which is significant in that it allows the species to be a good pollinator. These bees do not typically form extensive or complex colonies. Nests usually only contain a few hundred bees, at most. An average colony consists of about 100 to 200 worker bees.<br />
<br />
Distribution and habitat<br />
<br />
Bombus lapidarius is often found throughout Europe, including Britain and Ireland as well as parts of Greece, Germany, Sweden and Finland. This species typically has a fairly wide distribution. As described in the foraging patterns section, they can fly over 1500 meters to better forage for food. They typically are found in temperate regions. Further, colonies are often found in open terrain.<br />
<br />
B. lapidarius nests have been found in many different habitats, but the bees typically prefer open terrain as opposed to more heavily forested landscapes.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/crunchie-carruthers/">Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/crunchie-carruthers/49442930802/" title="Red-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) 25-08-2019 #3"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49442930802_698a4e9e68_m.jpg" width="240" height="179" alt="Red-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) 25-08-2019 #3" /></a></p>

<p>Red-tailed bumblebee<br />
Bombus lapidarius <br />
<br />
Scientific classification<br />
Kingdom:Animalia<br />
Phylum:Arthropoda<br />
Class:Insecta<br />
Order:Hymenoptera<br />
Family:Apidae<br />
Genus:Bombus<br />
Subgenus:Melanobombus<br />
Species:B. lapidarius<br />
Binomial name<br />
Bombus lapidarius<br />
<br />
Bombus lapidarius is a species of bumblebee in the subgenus Melanobombus. Commonly known as the red-tailed bumblebee, B. lapidarius can be found throughout much of Central Europe. Known for its distinctive black and red body, this social bee is important in pollination<br />
<br />
Taxonomy and phylogeny<br />
<br />
The red-tailed bumblebee is a part of the order Hymenoptera, family Apidae, and the genus Bombus, which includes many species including Bombus genalis, Bombus angustus, and Bombus nobilis<br />
<br />
Description and identification<br />
<br />
Red-tailed cuckoo bumblebee parasitizes the nests of the red-tailed bumblebee<br />
The red-tailed bumblebee is typically distinguished by its black body with red markings around the abdomen. Worker females and the queen look similar, except the queen is much larger than the worker females. Males typically have both the red and black coloration along with a yellow band around the abdomen and yellow markings on the face. Further, B. lapidarius tend to have a medium-sized proboscis, which is significant in that it allows the species to be a good pollinator. These bees do not typically form extensive or complex colonies. Nests usually only contain a few hundred bees, at most. An average colony consists of about 100 to 200 worker bees.<br />
<br />
Distribution and habitat<br />
<br />
Bombus lapidarius is often found throughout Europe, including Britain and Ireland as well as parts of Greece, Germany, Sweden and Finland. This species typically has a fairly wide distribution. As described in the foraging patterns section, they can fly over 1500 meters to better forage for food. They typically are found in temperate regions. Further, colonies are often found in open terrain.<br />
<br />
B. lapidarius nests have been found in many different habitats, but the bees typically prefer open terrain as opposed to more heavily forested landscapes.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/crunchie-carruthers/">Brian Carruthers-Dublin-Eire</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/crunchie-carruthers/49442930857/" title="Red-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) 25-08-2019 #2"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49442930857_87929f603e_m.jpg" width="240" height="179" alt="Red-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius) 25-08-2019 #2" /></a></p>

<p>Red-tailed bumblebee<br />
Bombus lapidarius <br />
<br />
Scientific classification<br />
Kingdom:Animalia<br />
Phylum:Arthropoda<br />
Class:Insecta<br />
Order:Hymenoptera<br />
Family:Apidae<br />
Genus:Bombus<br />
Subgenus:Melanobombus<br />
Species:B. lapidarius<br />
Binomial name<br />
Bombus lapidarius<br />
<br />
Bombus lapidarius is a species of bumblebee in the subgenus Melanobombus. Commonly known as the red-tailed bumblebee, B. lapidarius can be found throughout much of Central Europe. Known for its distinctive black and red body, this social bee is important in pollination<br />
<br />
Taxonomy and phylogeny<br />
<br />
The red-tailed bumblebee is a part of the order Hymenoptera, family Apidae, and the genus Bombus, which includes many species including Bombus genalis, Bombus angustus, and Bombus nobilis<br />
<br />
Description and identification<br />
<br />
Red-tailed cuckoo bumblebee parasitizes the nests of the red-tailed bumblebee<br />
The red-tailed bumblebee is typically distinguished by its black body with red markings around the abdomen. Worker females and the queen look similar, except the queen is much larger than the worker females. Males typically have both the red and black coloration along with a yellow band around the abdomen and yellow markings on the face. Further, B. lapidarius tend to have a medium-sized proboscis, which is significant in that it allows the species to be a good pollinator. These bees do not typically form extensive or complex colonies. Nests usually only contain a few hundred bees, at most. An average colony consists of about 100 to 200 worker bees.<br />
<br />
Distribution and habitat<br />
<br />
Bombus lapidarius is often found throughout Europe, including Britain and Ireland as well as parts of Greece, Germany, Sweden and Finland. This species typically has a fairly wide distribution. As described in the foraging patterns section, they can fly over 1500 meters to better forage for food. They typically are found in temperate regions. Further, colonies are often found in open terrain.<br />
<br />
B. lapidarius nests have been found in many different habitats, but the bees typically prefer open terrain as opposed to more heavily forested landscapes.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/manuelromaris/">Manuel ROMARIS</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/manuelromaris/49442243303/" title="Derry, Northern Ireland"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49442243303_d2f3b6d07c_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="Derry, Northern Ireland" /></a></p>

			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/wallflowergrownwild/">Wallflower Grown Wild</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/wallflowergrownwild/49442664006/" title="upper lake killarney"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49442664006_4b10555cbd_m.jpg" width="240" height="163" alt="upper lake killarney" /></a></p>

<p>from Charlotte C.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/frankfullard/">Frank Fullard</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/frankfullard/49442593072/" title="Stars"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49442593072_a627dbfbbb_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="Stars" /></a></p>

<p>&quot;We are all of us stars, and we deserve to twinkle&quot;. <br />
<br />
Marilyn Monroe</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441495721/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159554"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441495721_2839dba42e_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159554" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441497371/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159561"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441497371_7073cbe84f_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159561" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441494761/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159556"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441494761_f431c463a0_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159556" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441498966/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159557"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441498966_31fe15efdd_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159557" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441722497/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159555"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441722497_b95f47ea1d_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159555" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441024893/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159559"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441024893_77032f7da7_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159559" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441498506/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159558"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441498506_e084576e9c_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159558" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441721437/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159553"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441721437_c95285f0a0_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159553" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441720972/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159552"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441720972_33961ec199_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159552" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441496196/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159563"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441496196_0ba79a4731_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159563" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/infomatique/">infomatique</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/49441725087/" title="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159560"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49441725087_afc2437fce_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="UPPER DOMINICK STREET [DUBLIN 7]-159560" /></a></p>

<p>There are two sections to the street - Upper and Lower. The upper section now features a number of large Student Accommodation Complexes and three pubs.<br />
<br />
Originally a Georgian residential street, Dominick Street was constructed in the 1750s by the Dominick family. <br />
<br />
It was once a fashionable place to reside but with the passing of time the street fell into decline and many of large houses became tenement buildings.<br />
<br />
In the 1960s, Dublin City Council cleared Dominick Street of a number of the terraced houses on the lower section  that were classed as tenements and replaced them with eight blocks of five-storey flats, containing 198 units.<br />
<br />
Recently with a renewed commitment to regeneration and the creation of sustainable communities, the decision was made to demolish these flat complexes and replace them with a mixed-use, mixed tenure scheme, within the 1.26 ha site.</p>
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