Blarney

Recent Uploads tagged blarneycastle

			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/34396697@N00/">ho_hokus</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/34396697@N00/51698917372/" title="Under cover at Blarney Castle."><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51698917372_148ff742f2_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="Under cover at Blarney Castle." /></a></p>

<p>They look like traditional transport. Seen in one of the buildings at Blarney Castle, Ireland.<br />
Taken with my digital <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/34396697@N00/8683784167/in/photostream/">Fujifilm X20</a></p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/mendrakis/">John Donges</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mendrakis/53615895872/" title=""><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53615895872_654221be3f_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="" /></a></p>


			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/mendrakis/">John Donges</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mendrakis/53615895877/" title=""><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53615895877_70c33d40ae_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="" /></a></p>


			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/106274066@N07/">snelson951</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/106274066@N07/53485448390/" title="Blarney Castle, County Cork, Ireland"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53485448390_38a08a54a6_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="Blarney Castle, County Cork, Ireland" /></a></p>


			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/pkitt/">Silanov</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/pkitt/53557939762/" title="The skirl of the pipes"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53557939762_55cb5a51e6_m.jpg" width="180" height="240" alt="The skirl of the pipes" /></a></p>

<p>An Irish bagpiper in the gardens of Blarney Castle, Blarney, County Cork, Ireland<br />
<br />
<u>Some background information:</u><br />
<br />
The uilleann pipes, sometimes called Irish Bagpipes, are the characteristic national bagpipes of Ireland. The first bagpipes to be well attested for Ireland were similar, if not identical, to the Scottish Highland bagpipes that are now still played in Scotland. Uilleann pipes emerged during the early 18th century around the same time as the development of the bellows-driven Northumbrian smallpipes and the bellows-driven Scottish Lowland bagpipes. All three instruments were far quieter and sweeter in tone than their mouth-blown predecessors.<br />
<br />
Essentially their design required the joining of a bellows under the right arm, which pumped air via a tube to a leather bag under the left arm, which in turn supplied air at a constant pressure to the chanter, drones and regulators. At first, the Uilleann pipes were mostly used by the Protestant clergy, who employed them as an alternative to the church organ. But later, they have also become a popular instrument in the predominantly Catholic regions of Ireland. Today, they are an icon of Ireland and uilleann piping belongs to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage.<br />
<br />
Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney in the Irish County Cork. It is located just about 10 kilometres (6.2 miles) northwest of the City of Cork. Though earlier fortifications were built on the same spot, the current keep was built by the MacCarthy of Muskerry dynasty, a cadet branch of the Kings of Desmond, and dates from 1446. The famous Blarney Stone is among the machicolations of the castle.<br />
<br />
Originally, Blarney Castle dates from the 10th century, when a wooden castle was built on the site, although no evidence remains of this. Around 1210, a stone fortification was erected, which probably replaced the timber building. In 1446, it was destroyed but subsequently rebuilt by Cormac Láidir MacCarthy, Lord of Muscry and King of Munster, who also built castles at Kilcrea and Carrignamuck.<br />
<br />
During the Irish Confederate Wars., Blarney Castle was besieged and finally also seized in 1646 by Parliamentarian forces headed by Lord Broghill, who was under Oliver Cromwell‘s command. However, after the Restoration, the castle was restored by Donough MacCarty, who was made 1st Earl of Clancarty. In the course of the Williamite War in the 1690s, the 4th Earl of Clancarty, who also had the name Donough MacCarty, was captured. Thereafter, his lands including Blarney Castle were confiscated by the Williamites.<br />
<br />
In the following two decades, the castle changed hands several times (Sir Richard Pyne, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, owned it briefly), before it was purchased in the early 18th century by Sir James Jefferyes, governor of Cork City. Members of the Jefferyes family later built a large house near the old keep. After it had been destroyed by fire, a replacement mansion, known as Blarney House, was erected in 1874, overlooking the nearby lake. The new mansion was designed in Scottish baronial-style. In the mid-19th century, the Jefferyes and Colthurst families were joined by marriage. Today, the Colthurst family still occupies the demesne. <br />
<br />
Blarney Castle is now a partial ruin with some accessible rooms and battlements. At the top of the castle lies the Stone of Eloquence, better known as the Blarney Stone. Tourists visiting the castle may hang upside-down over a sheer drop to kiss the stone, which is said to give the gift of eloquence. This ritual of kissing the Blarney Stone has already been performed by millions of people, including world statesmen, popular authors and famous actors. The kiss, however, is not casually achieved. To touch the stone with one's lips, the participant must ascend to the castle's peak and then lean over backwards on the parapet's edge. This is traditionally achieved with the help of an assistant. Although the parapet is now fitted with wrought-iron guide rails and protective crossbars, the ritual can still trigger attacks of acrophobia.<br />
<br />
There are many versions of the origin of the stone, including a claim that it was the Lia Fáil – a divine stone upon which Irish kings were crowned. But there’s also a story suggesting that the stone was presented to Cormac MacCarthy by Robert the Bruce in 1314 in recognition of his support in the Battle of Bannockburn. This legend holds that the Blarney Stone wa a piece of the Stone of Scone that was used in the coronation of Scottish monarchs until the 13th century.<br />
<br />
According to another legend it was Queen Elisabeth I, who created the word &quot;blarney&quot; that is still used as a synonym for &quot;gossip&quot;. After then lord of the castle Cormac Teige McCarthy had made a lot of excuses about the delayed surrender of his stronghold, it is said that the impatient Queen interrupted the reading of the minutes of the negotiations by shouting that this would be all &quot;blarney&quot;.<br />
<br />
Surrounding the castle are extensive gardens. There are paths touring the grounds with signs pointing out the various attractions just like several natural rock formations with fanciful names such as Druid's Circle, Witch's Cave and the Wishing Steps. The grounds also include a poison garden with numerous poisonous plants, including wolfsbane, mandrake, ricinus, opium poppies and cannabis. Blarney House is open to the public and if you go there, don’t pass on climbing up the wooden staircase, kissing the Blarney Stone and getting your portion of additional eloquence.</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/pkitt/">Silanov</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/pkitt/53558798776/" title="The knack of eloquence"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53558798776_ba3b97fd67_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="The knack of eloquence" /></a></p>

<p>A view of Blarney Castle from Blarney Gardens, Blarney, County Cork, Ireland<br />
<br />
<u>Some background information:</u><br />
<br />
Blarney Castle is a medieval stronghold in Blarney in the Irish County Cork. It is located just about 10 kilometres (6.2 miles) northwest of the City of Cork. Though earlier fortifications were built on the same spot, the current keep was built by the MacCarthy of Muskerry dynasty, a cadet branch of the Kings of Desmond, and dates from 1446. The famous Blarney Stone is among the machicolations of the castle.<br />
<br />
Originally, Blarney Castle dates from the 10th century, when a wooden castle was built on the site, although no evidence remains of this. Around 1210, a stone fortification was erected, which probably replaced the timber building. In 1446, it was destroyed but subsequently rebuilt by Cormac Láidir MacCarthy, Lord of Muscry and King of Munster, who also built castles at Kilcrea and Carrignamuck.<br />
<br />
During the Irish Confederate Wars., Blarney Castle was besieged and finally also seized in 1646 by Parliamentarian forces headed by Lord Broghill, who was under Oliver Cromwell‘s command. However, after the Restoration, the castle was restored by Donough MacCarty, who was made 1st Earl of Clancarty. In the course of the Williamite War in the 1690s, the 4th Earl of Clancarty, who also had the name Donough MacCarty, was captured. Thereafter, his lands including Blarney Castle were confiscated by the Williamites.<br />
<br />
In the following two decades, the castle changed hands several times (Sir Richard Pyne, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, owned it briefly), before it was purchased in the early 18th century by Sir James Jefferyes, governor of Cork City. Members of the Jefferyes family later built a large house near the old keep. After it had been destroyed by fire, a replacement mansion, known as Blarney House, was erected in 1874, overlooking the nearby lake. The new mansion was designed in Scottish baronial-style. In the mid-19th century, the Jefferyes and Colthurst families were joined by marriage. Today, the Colthurst family still occupies the demesne. <br />
<br />
Blarney Castle is now a partial ruin with some accessible rooms and battlements. At the top of the castle lies the Stone of Eloquence, better known as the Blarney Stone. Tourists visiting the castle may hang upside-down over a sheer drop to kiss the stone, which is said to give the gift of eloquence. This ritual of kissing the Blarney Stone has already been performed by millions of people, including world statesmen, popular authors and famous actors. The kiss, however, is not casually achieved. To touch the stone with one's lips, the participant must ascend to the castle's peak and then lean over backwards on the parapet's edge. This is traditionally achieved with the help of an assistant. Although the parapet is now fitted with wrought-iron guide rails and protective crossbars, the ritual can still trigger attacks of acrophobia.<br />
<br />
There are many versions of the origin of the stone, including a claim that it was the Lia Fáil – a divine stone upon which Irish kings were crowned. But there’s also a story suggesting that the stone was presented to Cormac MacCarthy by Robert the Bruce in 1314 in recognition of his support in the Battle of Bannockburn. This legend holds that the Blarney Stone wa a piece of the Stone of Scone that was used in the coronation of Scottish monarchs until the 13th century.<br />
<br />
According to another legend it was Queen Elisabeth I, who created the word &quot;blarney&quot; that is still used as a synonym for &quot;gossip&quot;. After then lord of the castle Cormac Teige McCarthy had made a lot of excuses about the delayed surrender of his stronghold, it is said that the impatient Queen interrupted the reading of the minutes of the negotiations by shouting that this would be all &quot;blarney&quot;.<br />
<br />
Surrounding the castle are extensive gardens. There are paths touring the grounds with signs pointing out the various attractions just like several natural rock formations with fanciful names such as Druid's Circle, Witch's Cave and the Wishing Steps. The grounds also include a poison garden with numerous poisonous plants, including wolfsbane, mandrake, ricinus, opium poppies and cannabis. Blarney House is open to the public and if you go there, don’t pass on climbing up the wooden staircase, kissing the Blarney Stone and getting your portion of additional eloquence.</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/193968112@N02/">thomas-soder</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/193968112@N02/53553596106/" title="026298"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53553596106_32e2effc54_m.jpg" width="240" height="161" alt="026298" /></a></p>

<p>Blarney Castle, Ireland</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/dfratto/">Dante Fratto Photography</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/dfratto/53536909731/" title="Ireland"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53536909731_f4645c15f7_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="Ireland" /></a></p>

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			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/dfratto/">Dante Fratto Photography</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/dfratto/53536909826/" title="Ireland"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53536909826_35231a21c8_m.jpg" width="240" height="160" alt="Ireland" /></a></p>

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			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/omnia_mutantur/">omnia_mutantur</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/omnia_mutantur/53527331965/" title="prisoner"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53527331965_b99afe28f3_m.jpg" width="151" height="240" alt="prisoner" /></a></p>

<p>blarney - ireland - may 2023</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/jbarc/">jbarc in BC</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jbarc/53462958940/" title="The Blarney Castle"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53462958940_6a34bc514c_m.jpg" width="240" height="161" alt="The Blarney Castle" /></a></p>

<p>     I kissed the Blarney Stone but it is far from easy. You have to lay on your back, grasp some bars with your hands, and hyperextend your neck and head to reach the stone. It was raining at the time so I have no idea what I actually kissed. This gave me the &quot;gift of the gab&quot; for the rest of my life. <br />
<br />
<br />
Blarney Castle (Irish: Caisleán na Blarnan) is a medieval stronghold in Blarney, near Cork, Ireland. Though earlier fortifications were built on the same spot, the current keep was built by the MacCarthy of Muskerry dynasty, a cadet branch of the Kings of Desmond, and dates from 1446. The Blarney Stone is among the machicolations of the castle.<br />
<br />
The Blarney Stone (Irish: Cloch na Blarnan) is a block of Carboniferous limestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle, Blarney, about 8 kilometres (5 miles) from Cork, Ireland. According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of the gab (great eloquence or skill at flattery). The stone was set into a tower of the castle in 1446. The castle is a popular tourist site in Ireland, attracting visitors from all over the world to kiss the stone and tour the castle and its gardens.<br />
<br />
The word blarney has come to mean &quot;clever, flattering, or coaxing talk&quot;. Irish politician John O'Connor Power defined it this way: &quot;Blarney is something more than mere flattery. It is flattery sweetened by humour and flavoured by wit. Those who mix with Irish folk have many examples of it in their everyday experience. &quot;Letitia Elizabeth Landon described its contemporary meaning in an article entitled 'Blarney Castle' in 1832.<br />
<br />
The kiss, however, is not casually achieved. To touch the stone with one's lips, the participant must ascend to the castle's peak through narrow steep stairways, then lean over backwards on the parapet's edge while holding onto protective railing and crossbars. Before the safeguards were installed, the kiss was performed with real risk to life and limb, as participants were grasped by the ankles and dangled bodily from the height.</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/altair_sd/">altair_sd</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/altair_sd/53381418824/" title="IMG_2563.jpg"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53381418824_8d0a25f38a_m.jpg" width="180" height="240" alt="IMG_2563.jpg" /></a></p>

<p>Irlande - Blarney Castle - Ireland</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/altair_sd/">altair_sd</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/altair_sd/53381276103/" title="IMG_2564.jpg"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53381276103_be6c705694_m.jpg" width="180" height="240" alt="IMG_2564.jpg" /></a></p>

<p>Irlande - Blarney Castle - Ireland</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/altair_sd/">altair_sd</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/altair_sd/53381540230/" title="IMG_2567.jpg"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53381540230_8a7d5c5a60_m.jpg" width="180" height="240" alt="IMG_2567.jpg" /></a></p>

<p>Irlande - Blarney Castle - Ireland</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/altair_sd/">altair_sd</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/altair_sd/53381277508/" title="IMG_2578.jpg"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53381277508_392437dcdf_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="IMG_2578.jpg" /></a></p>

<p>Irlande - Blarney Castle - Ireland</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/altair_sd/">altair_sd</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/altair_sd/53381531065/" title="IMG_2546.jpg"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53381531065_44fd6e95c9_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="IMG_2546.jpg" /></a></p>

<p>Irlande - Blarney Castle - Ireland</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/mendrakis/">John Donges</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mendrakis/53618648423/" title=""><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53618648423_215f516f35_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="" /></a></p>


			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/mendrakis/">John Donges</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mendrakis/53618776144/" title=""><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53618776144_a3ac4a4af7_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="" /></a></p>


			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/altair_sd/">altair_sd</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/altair_sd/53380178452/" title="IMG_2569.jpg"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53380178452_fd9d2a4aa4_m.jpg" width="240" height="180" alt="IMG_2569.jpg" /></a></p>

<p>Irlande - Blarney Castle - Ireland</p>
			<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/people/altair_sd/">altair_sd</a> posted a photo:</p>
	
<p><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/altair_sd/53381420364/" title="IMG_2575.jpg"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53381420364_5d536eed98_m.jpg" width="180" height="240" alt="IMG_2575.jpg" /></a></p>

<p>Irlande - Blarney Castle - Ireland</p>
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